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image: Patent Granted for Fraudulent Science

Patent Granted for Fraudulent Science

By | February 17, 2014

The US Patent and Trademark Office has awarded patent protection to refuted discoveries on human stem cells.  

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Reducing Whistleblower Risk

Opinion: Reducing Whistleblower Risk

By | February 11, 2014

It takes significant time and money for a scientist to defend his or her accusation of research misconduct.

5 Comments

image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

0 Comments

image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

image: Unauthorized HIV Trial Leader Fined

Unauthorized HIV Trial Leader Fined

By | February 3, 2014

A Spanish researcher faces a penalty after conducting a study for which he never obtained proper approvals or insurance.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

2 Comments

image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

1 Comment

image: Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

By | December 16, 2013

Dust-borne bacteria from houses with dogs can prevent allergies in mice by changing their gut microbes.

2 Comments

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