The Scientist

» misconduct and immunology

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nosing Around

Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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image: Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

By | October 21, 2016

Type I interferon organizes several immune mechanisms to suppress B cell responses to a chronic viral infection.

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image: Week in Review: October 17–21

Week in Review: October 17–21

By | October 21, 2016

Report finds that pathologist involved in anonymous defamation case committed multiple acts of misconduct; growing eggs from stem cells; neutrophils’ role in metastasis; convergent evolution in birds

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ACLU lawyers representing the post-publication peer review site have filed a motion to admit the existence of a university investigation that found pathologist Fazlul Sarkar guilty of misconduct.

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image: Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation

Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation

By | October 19, 2016

Wayne State University’s conclusion that pathologist Fazlul Sarkar committed research misconduct could affect the ongoing legal proceedings related to anonymous critics of his work.

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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