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image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: September 5–9

Week in Review: September 5–9

By | September 9, 2016

Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 

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image: Continued Fallout from Macchiarini Misconduct

Continued Fallout from Macchiarini Misconduct

By | September 7, 2016

The sacked researcher and surgeon was not properly vetted by the Swedish institutions that hired him in 2010, according to an independent review panel. 

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image: Duke Sued for Millions over Fraudulent Data

Duke Sued for Millions over Fraudulent Data

By | September 6, 2016

A lawsuit claims that Duke University and biologist Erin Potts-Kant used bad data in projects funded by dozens of government grants.

2 Comments

image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

1 Comment

In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

1 Comment

image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

1 Comment

image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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A former Mount Sinai School of Medicine faculty member shot the institution’s dean, The New York Times reports. 

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