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» misconduct and cell & molecular biology

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image: How Autophagy Works

How Autophagy Works

By | February 1, 2012

There are five steps of autophagosome biogenesis: induction, expansion, vesicle completion, fusion, and cargo degradation. 

0 Comments

image: Sweet and Sour Science

Sweet and Sour Science

By | February 1, 2012

Japanese researchers unravel the mystery of miracle fruit.

18 Comments

image: The Enigmatic Membrane

The Enigmatic Membrane

By | February 1, 2012

Despite years of research, the longstanding mystery of where the autophagosome gets its double lipid bilayers is not much clearer.

6 Comments

image: Gain a Chromosome and Adapt

Gain a Chromosome and Adapt

By | January 30, 2012

Research in yeast shows that aneuploidy is both a consequence of and an adaptation to stress.

18 Comments

image: The Making of a Trait

The Making of a Trait

By | January 26, 2012

Populations of organisms acquire beneficial traits repeatedly and rapidly through co-evolution with other species and through gene interaction.

9 Comments

image: Misconduct Called Out on YouTube

Misconduct Called Out on YouTube

By | January 26, 2012

A 6-minute video posted on YouTube documents more than 60 alleged cases of image manipulation from 24 papers by a single researcher.

9 Comments

image: Marooned Chromosomes Cause Cancer?

Marooned Chromosomes Cause Cancer?

By | January 23, 2012

Chromosomes accidentally stranded outside of the nucleus could contribute to cancer formation.

3 Comments

image: Cellular Workout

Cellular Workout

By | January 18, 2012

Autophagy, the cell’s recycling system, may be responsible for the health benefits of exercise.

0 Comments

image: Wine Researcher Caught Faking

Wine Researcher Caught Faking

By | January 13, 2012

One of the leading scientific voices touting the health benefits of red wine fabricated data dozens of times.

21 Comments

image: More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

By | January 12, 2012

The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.

18 Comments

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