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image: More Evidence of Stem Cell Errors

More Evidence of Stem Cell Errors

By | February 25, 2014

A committee at the University of Düsseldorf finds misconduct in cardiologist Bodo-Eckehard Strauer’s work.  

0 Comments

image: Patent Granted for Fraudulent Science

Patent Granted for Fraudulent Science

By | February 17, 2014

The US Patent and Trademark Office has awarded patent protection to refuted discoveries on human stem cells.  

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Reducing Whistleblower Risk

Opinion: Reducing Whistleblower Risk

By | February 11, 2014

It takes significant time and money for a scientist to defend his or her accusation of research misconduct.

5 Comments

image: Triglyceride Clock

Triglyceride Clock

By | February 10, 2014

The timing of meals affects the levels of lipids in the livers of mice, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

1 Comment

image: Unauthorized HIV Trial Leader Fined

Unauthorized HIV Trial Leader Fined

By | February 3, 2014

A Spanish researcher faces a penalty after conducting a study for which he never obtained proper approvals or insurance.

0 Comments

image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

0 Comments

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