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image: Settlement Reached in Misconduct Case

Settlement Reached in Misconduct Case

By | April 19, 2013

A cancer researcher found guilty of misconduct has reached a settlement with the ORI that allows him to apply for federal research funding.

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image: Jailed for Faking Data

Jailed for Faking Data

By | April 18, 2013

A researcher working for a US pharmaceutical company’s Scotland branch is sent to prison for falsifying safety test data on experimental drugs due for clinical trials.

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image: Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

By | April 9, 2013

A former University of Washington researcher did commit misconduct 10 years ago, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Novartis Linked to Retracted Papers?

Novartis Linked to Retracted Papers?

By | April 2, 2013

A Japanese newspaper claims that the pharma giant funded flawed research that revealed extra health benefits for one of its top-selling drugs.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.

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image: Week in Review

Week in Review

By | March 15, 2013

Disgruntled Nobel loser sues; brain trauma researchers search for biomarker of a chronic condition; receptor for novel coronavirus found; the rise of transcriptomics; and ethical oversight of participant-led research

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

2 Comments

image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

2 Comments

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