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» misconduct and developmental biology

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: MIT Lab Retracts Paper

MIT Lab Retracts Paper

By | February 15, 2013

A paper describing a new method for imaging synapse formation has been retracted after it emerged that the first author falsified data to prove its effectiveness.

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image: Physiologist Faked Data

Physiologist Faked Data

By | February 5, 2013

A Case Western Reserve University researcher is found guilty of altering the number of samples and results to inflate the statistical significance of his findings.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Top Science Scandals of 2012

Top Science Scandals of 2012

By | December 17, 2012

This year’s roundup of bad behavior in the life sciences and new initiatives to prevent misconduct


image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: GM Rice Researchers Sacked

GM Rice Researchers Sacked

By | December 13, 2012

An official investigation into a controversial GM rice study carried out with Chinese schoolchildren has resulted in the removal of three China-based researchers.


image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.


image: Contributors


By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.


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