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image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.

4 Comments

An independent investigator says that the surgeon misrepresented the truth in papers about artificial trachea transplants.

1 Comment

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Duke Settles Negligence Suit

Duke Settles Negligence Suit

By | May 5, 2015

Participants in controversial cancer trials have “resolved and settled all claims against” Duke University and oncologist Anil Potti, who previously admitted to fraud, lawyer says.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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An investigation has found the thoracic surgeon who transplanted artificial tracheae into patients not guilty of overhyping his research.

2 Comments

image: Plant Biologist’s Work Investigated

Plant Biologist’s Work Investigated

By | April 2, 2015

Institutions where RNA interference scientist Olivier Voinnet has worked are looking into allegations of misconduct.

3 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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