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image: PubPeer’s Appeal for Anonymity Continues

PubPeer’s Appeal for Anonymity Continues

By | January 21, 2016

The site’s lawyers, along with renowned scientists, filed briefs to an appeals court asking to protect a commenter’s identification.

3 Comments

image: GM Paper Flagged by Politician Retracted

GM Paper Flagged by Politician Retracted

By | January 18, 2016

One of three suspect publications from a group of scientists in Italy is pulled for plagiarism while an investigation is ongoing.

0 Comments

image: Expected Retraction Published

Expected Retraction Published

By | January 13, 2016

The repeal of a Molecular Endocrinology paper is the second of three anticipated retractions from a cell biologist.

0 Comments

image: Fraudulent Paper Pulled

Fraudulent Paper Pulled

By | January 5, 2016

Nature retracts a study six years after an investigation found that the protein structures it reported were fabricated.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: ORI Names New Director

ORI Names New Director

By | December 6, 2015

Neuroscientist Kathryn Partin will lead the US Office of Research Integrity.

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

5 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

0 Comments

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