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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

By | April 29, 2013

Researchers identify a herpesvirus gene persisting in the cells of calves suffering from malignant catarrhal disease.

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image: Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

By | April 22, 2013

Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Settlement Reached in Misconduct Case

Settlement Reached in Misconduct Case

By | April 19, 2013

A cancer researcher found guilty of misconduct has reached a settlement with the ORI that allows him to apply for federal research funding.

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image: Jailed for Faking Data

Jailed for Faking Data

By | April 18, 2013

A researcher working for a US pharmaceutical company’s Scotland branch is sent to prison for falsifying safety test data on experimental drugs due for clinical trials.

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image: Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

Decade-Long Misconduct Case Closed

By | April 9, 2013

A former University of Washington researcher did commit misconduct 10 years ago, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

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image: “Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

“Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

By | April 5, 2013

Researchers can identify individuals by the unique chemical signatures in their breath, suggesting that exhalations could be used for metabolomic tests.

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image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

By | April 3, 2013

Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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