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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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image: Infographic: Web of Retractions

Infographic: Web of Retractions

By | May 1, 2017

See coauthors' connections to eight researchers with problematic papers.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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A committee says an independent organization designed to foster research integrity would stem misconduct.

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image: Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper

By | March 22, 2017

The embattled thoracic surgeon blames his former employer, the Karolinska Institute, for losing data related to the retracted research.

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image: The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

The Past and Present of Research Integrity in China

By | March 1, 2017

Several initiatives aim to improve research integrity in the country, but recent high-profile cases of misconduct highlight a lingering problem.

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Seventeen scientists found to have committed research misconduct during the last 25 years have since collectively received more than $101 million in NIH funding.

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