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image: Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.


image: Top Science Scandals of 2014

Top Science Scandals of 2014

By | December 25, 2014

The stem cell that never was; post-publication peer review website faces legal trouble; biosecurity breaches at federal labs


image: STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

By | December 22, 2014

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.


image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.


image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

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image: New Ruling on Old Misconduct Case

New Ruling on Old Misconduct Case

By | December 10, 2014

The Office of Research Integrity has finally pointed the finger in a case of suspected data manipulation in a 2006 Science paper.


image: Surgeon Faces Misconduct Allegations

Surgeon Faces Misconduct Allegations

By | December 1, 2014

The scientist who implanted artificial windpipes into several patients is being accused of conducting the procedures without proper ethical review.


image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.


image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.


image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.



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