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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Marine Life Trending Larger

Marine Life Trending Larger

By | February 23, 2015

Ocean animals have been getting bigger over the millennia, according to an analysis of thousands of genera that have plied Earth’s seas since the Cambrian Period.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

Clinic Trial Problems Kept Mum

By | February 11, 2015

Despite documented dysfunction in a number of studies, rarely do those problems get a mention in the resulting publications, according to a new study.

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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image: Author Sues Journal

Author Sues Journal

By | February 10, 2015

The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers.

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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