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image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

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image: Unraveling H7N9’s History

Unraveling H7N9’s History

By | December 30, 2014

An analysis of stored samples shows that H7N9 precursor H9N2, a virus widespread in chickens, has shown increased fitness in recent years.

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image: Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.

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image: Top Science Scandals of 2014

Top Science Scandals of 2014

By | December 25, 2014

The stem cell that never was; post-publication peer review website faces legal trouble; biosecurity breaches at federal labs

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image: STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

By | December 22, 2014

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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