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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

6 Comments

image: ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

By | May 25, 2016

A former scientist at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago made up more than 70 experiments on heart cells, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

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Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

5 Comments

image: Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

By | May 4, 2016

This one will be largely based on the discredited anti-vaccine researcher’s 2010 book.

10 Comments

image: New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

By | May 3, 2016

Studies in Research Integrity and Peer Review analyze ethics and quality in both science and publishing.

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The federal agency publishes a brief note alleging another ethical breach by former Karolinska Institute researcher Paolo Macchiarini.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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