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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

By | February 28, 2017

Human embryonic kidney cells use actin cytoskeletal networks to organize proteins on the surfaces of cell membranes.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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