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image: Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding

By | February 28, 2017

Human embryonic kidney cells use actin cytoskeletal networks to organize proteins on the surfaces of cell membranes.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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image: Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression

Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression

By | August 24, 2016

Applying a mechanical force that pulls on a cell stretches chromatin, facilitating transcription, scientists show.

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image: The Handedness of Cells

The Handedness of Cells

By | June 17, 2015

Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.

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image: Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

By | May 4, 2015

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.   

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image: Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

By | May 27, 2014

Technique allows researchers to see the inner workings of cellular scaffolding molecules actin and tubulin.

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image: Inactive Actin

Inactive Actin

By | May 1, 2014

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis shuts down during mitosis in eukaryotic cells because all of the required actin is hoarded by the cytoskeleton.

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image: Gravity Determines Cell Size

Gravity Determines Cell Size

By | October 29, 2013

Researchers show that cells may have evolved to be small because of gravitational forces.

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