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image: Triglyceride Clock

Triglyceride Clock

By | February 10, 2014

The timing of meals affects the levels of lipids in the livers of mice, according to a study.

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image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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