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image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

3 Comments

image: The Price of DNA IDs

The Price of DNA IDs

By | September 16, 2013

Following natural disasters or violent political turmoil, DNA science can help identify victims. But what if a country can’t afford the technology?

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image: Opinion: Making Room for Rising Stars

Opinion: Making Room for Rising Stars

By | September 4, 2013

Dealing with the delicate matter of retirement for aging academics

7 Comments

image: A New Way of Seeing

A New Way of Seeing

By | September 1, 2013

Inspiration and controversy attended the birth of magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technology that changed the course of human medicine.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI</em>

Book Excerpt from Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

By | September 1, 2013

In Chapter 6, “The first fruitful weeks,” author M. Joan Dawson describes her late husband’s first steps in the invention of a revolutionary imaging technology.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2013

Rocket Girl, The Cancer Chronicles, Abominable Science!, and The Sports Gene

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

2 Comments

image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

0 Comments

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