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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: First North American H5N1 Death

First North American H5N1 Death

By | January 9, 2014

A person in Canada has died of the first confirmed human case of H5N1 avian flu in North America.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

By | January 6, 2014

Researchers find evidence that transposable elements, also known as jumping genes, may contribute to the development of the psychiatric disorder.

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image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

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image: Elder Pharmacology

Elder Pharmacology

By | January 1, 2014

Studying and treating the chronic diseases associated with aging needs serious revamping.

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image: Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

By | January 1, 2014

Tuberculosis is exquisitely adapted to the human body. Researchers need a new game plan for beating it.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

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