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image: Picking Out Patterns

Picking Out Patterns

By | May 1, 2017

Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.

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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell's protein-degrading machine

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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