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image: Gut Microbiome Heritability

Gut Microbiome Heritability

By | November 6, 2014

Analyzing data from a large twin study, researchers have homed in on how host genetics can shape the gut microbiome.

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image: Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment

Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment

By | November 4, 2014

Researchers have developed a technique for determining the species of snake responsible for a bite by sequencing genetic material from the fang marks.

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image: Rare Disease to Inform Ebola Susceptibility?

Rare Disease to Inform Ebola Susceptibility?

By | November 4, 2014

Parents of children with the fatal genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C are taking an active role in research to understand how mutations associated with the disease may protect against Ebola.

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image: Enhanced Enhancers

Enhanced Enhancers

By | November 1, 2014

The recent discovery of super-enhancers may offer new drug targets for a range of diseases.

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image: Mitochondria Munchers

Mitochondria Munchers

By | November 1, 2014

Glial cells consume mitochondria released by neurons in the optic nerve.

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.

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image: Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

By | October 27, 2014

Cellular blebs shed by tumor cells can process short stretches of RNA that go on to induce tumor formation in neighboring cells.

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image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

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image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”

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