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image: Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

By | March 1, 2017

Fecal transplants from humans with irritable bowel syndrome and anxiety into mice lead to similar symptoms and anxiety-like behavior in the rodents, researchers report.  

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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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image: Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

By | February 22, 2017

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide ornithologists with a new way to gather birdsong data. 

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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