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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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image: Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

By | February 22, 2017

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide ornithologists with a new way to gather birdsong data. 

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

By | January 5, 2017

A visual motion-sensing brain region found in all four-limbed vertebrates displays unique properties in Anna’s hummingbirds.

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image: More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

By | December 29, 2016

The latest CRISPR deactivators to be discovered turn off the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 widely used in genome editing.

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