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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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image: Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

By | February 22, 2017

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide ornithologists with a new way to gather birdsong data. 

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

By | January 5, 2017

A visual motion-sensing brain region found in all four-limbed vertebrates displays unique properties in Anna’s hummingbirds.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 23, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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