The Scientist

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image: Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

By | July 11, 2013

Using lentiviral vectors to replace mutated genes in blood stem cells, scientists successfully treat two rare diseases apparently without causing harmful side effects.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 8, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.

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image: Bird Song Explains Why Babies Babble

Bird Song Explains Why Babies Babble

By | July 2, 2013

Both birds and children struggle to learn transitions between syllables, practicing them extensively as they learn to speak or sing.

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image: Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

By | July 1, 2013

Researchers discover that unlike brown fat cells, white fat cells can directly sense cooling temperatures to switch on genes that control heat production.

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image: New Species on the Block

New Species on the Block

By | June 27, 2013

A bird living in the Cambodian capital is named as a new species.

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image: Father of Crystallography Dies

Father of Crystallography Dies

By | June 17, 2013

Nobel Laureate Jerome Karle has passed away at age 94.

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Opioid Receptors Implicated in PTSD

Opioid Receptors Implicated in PTSD

By | June 7, 2013

A compound that targets a particular opioid receptor in the amygdala reduces the formation of PTSD-like systems in mice subjected to severe trauma.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

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