The Scientist

» birds and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

0 Comments

image: Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

Drones Covertly Record Songbirds

By | February 22, 2017

Unmanned aerial vehicles provide ornithologists with a new way to gather birdsong data. 

0 Comments

image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

0 Comments

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

0 Comments

image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

0 Comments

image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

1 Comment

image: How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

By | January 5, 2017

A visual motion-sensing brain region found in all four-limbed vertebrates displays unique properties in Anna’s hummingbirds.

0 Comments

Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 23, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Human Cord Plasma Protein Boosts Cognitive Function in Older Mice
AAAS