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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Overspending on Overhead

Overspending on Overhead

By | February 1, 2015

Federal research dollars are needlessly wasted as scientists spend more and more of their time trying to recoup operational costs.

5 Comments

image: Republicans Claim Support for Science

Republicans Claim Support for Science

By | January 15, 2015

But at least one science advocate isn’t buying it.

2 Comments

image: Funding Turnaround?

Funding Turnaround?

By | January 12, 2015

The National Institutes of Health saw a slight improvement in success rate for R01 or equivalent grants last year.

3 Comments

image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

2 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

0 Comments

image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: Incentivizing Breakthroughs

Incentivizing Breakthroughs

By | December 1, 2014

With scientific funding on shaky ground, big-dollar competitions offer a new way for life-science innovators to bring their ideas to fruition.

1 Comment

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