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image: Opinion: What Is Life?

Opinion: What Is Life?

By | February 16, 2012

Designing the simplest possible living organism artificially may lend clues as to what life is.

100 Comments

image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

By | February 3, 2012

While biotechnology has met with mixed public reactions, to date nanotechnology seems to invoke much less public concern.

42 Comments

image: Never Say Never

Never Say Never

By | February 1, 2012

Novel observations can sometimes be correct for unexpected reasons.

12 Comments

image: Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

By | January 30, 2012

Celebrity spokespeople for pharma companies can manipulate the public’s understanding of disease.

30 Comments

image: Opinion: Occupy Science?

Opinion: Occupy Science?

By | January 24, 2012

Biomedical research can learn from citizen science, which is grounded in strong relationships with study participants.

33 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Confounded Cancer Markers

Opinion: Confounded Cancer Markers

By | December 7, 2011

Prognostic signatures have become popular tools in cancer research, but it turns out signatures made of random genes are prognostic as well.

39 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

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