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image: Microfluidics Within Reach

Microfluidics Within Reach

By | March 9, 2015

A programmable, hand-operated microfluidic device could help researchers designing more-accessible diagnostics.

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image: Next Generation: Precision Blood Rinsing

Next Generation: Precision Blood Rinsing

By | November 25, 2014

A microfluidic device can safely remove glycerol from thawed red blood cells in minutes, potentially making frozen blood more feasible for routine transfusions.

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image: Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements

By | September 1, 2014

Recent developments in cell transfection and molecular delivery technologies

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Singularly Alluring

Singularly Alluring

By | June 1, 2014

Microfluidic tools and techniques for investigating cells, one by one

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: Narrow Straits

Narrow Straits

By | July 1, 2013

Transfecting molecules into cells is as easy as one, two, squeeze.

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image: Sticky Lithography

Sticky Lithography

By | March 1, 2013

Scotch tape and a scalpel provide a MacGyver-esque approach to microfabrication.

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