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image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 6, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

3 Comments

image: UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

By | January 28, 2015

Using ultraviolet light to disinfect drinking water may simply drive bacteria to dormancy, rather than kill them.

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image: GMO “Kill Switches”

GMO “Kill Switches”

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists design bacteria reliant upon synthetic amino acids to contain genetically modified organisms.

6 Comments

image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

By | December 23, 2014

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

By | December 18, 2014

Eradication of microbial disease likely accompanied by poor quality of life for remaining species

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