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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Legacies Left Behind in 2015

Legacies Left Behind in 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A look at the contributions of some of the prominent researchers who died this year

3 Comments

image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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image: MERS Vax Tested in Camels

MERS Vax Tested in Camels

By | December 17, 2015

Scientists conduct the first MERS-CoV vaccine trials in camels and provide viral lineage evidence of camel-to-human transfer.

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image: Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

By | December 16, 2015

Results could explain why the marine mammals have been stranding on the West coast in record numbers.

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image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 

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image: First Dengue Vax Approved

First Dengue Vax Approved

By | December 11, 2015

Mexico’s health ministry has OKed the vaccine for people between nine and 45 years old.

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image: Complications of Brain Manipulations

Complications of Brain Manipulations

By | December 9, 2015

The complex connectivities of mammalian and avian brains can confound the outcomes of transient neural manipulations, researchers show.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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