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The Scientist

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image: Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

By | April 18, 2012

Introducing DELSA Global, a community initiative to connect experts, share data, and democratize science.

2 Comments

image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

image: Monkeys “Read” Writing

Monkeys “Read” Writing

By | April 12, 2012

Baboons are able to distinguish printed English words from nonsense sequences of letters—the first step in the reading process.

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image: Anti-science in Tennessee Classrooms

Anti-science in Tennessee Classrooms

By | April 12, 2012

A new law opens the door to teaching creationism and climate change denialism in the state's public schools.

60 Comments

image: A Universal Cancer Vaccine?

A Universal Cancer Vaccine?

By | April 10, 2012

A vaccine that targets 90 percent of all cancers shows promise in early clinical trials.

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image: Bird Flu Mutations Revealed

Bird Flu Mutations Revealed

By | April 5, 2012

One of the researchers who created a highly transmissible form of the bird flu virus has broken his silence and shared which mutations made it possible.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: The Risk of Forgoing Vaccines

Opinion: The Risk of Forgoing Vaccines

By | April 3, 2012

Herd immunity, or the protection of individuals who are not vaccinated due to generally high vaccination rates within a population, does not currently exist in many pockets of the US.

100 Comments

image: Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

By | April 2, 2012

Vaccination via tiny microneedles elicits a powerful immune response in the skin.

8 Comments

Contributors

April 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

By | April 1, 2012

A 17th century Danish doctor arranges a museum of natural history oddities in his own home.

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