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An early-stage study of the effectiveness of a lung-cancer vaccine developed by scientists in Cuba could start as early as next month.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Americas Declared Measles-Free

Americas Declared Measles-Free

By | September 30, 2016

Health officials announce that measles is no longer endemic to any region in the Americas, thanks to widespread vaccination.

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image: Congress Approves $1.1 Billion for Zika

Congress Approves $1.1 Billion for Zika

By | September 30, 2016

The money will go toward vaccine development and assisting communities at risk.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Another DNA Vaccine for Zika Shows Promise

Another DNA Vaccine for Zika Shows Promise

By | September 22, 2016

A plasmid-based vaccine against the virus is immunogenic in mice and protects Rhesus macaques against infection, researchers report.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: More Zika Vaccines Progress Toward Human Trials

More Zika Vaccines Progress Toward Human Trials

By | August 4, 2016

Researchers show three vaccines protect nonhuman primates from infection.

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