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image: Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

By | September 19, 2013

The body’s own pain-quelling system may be at the root of chronic pain and symptoms of opioid withdrawal, according to a new study in mice.

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image: SIV Vaccine Success

SIV Vaccine Success

By | September 13, 2013

A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine eliminated simian immunodeficiency virus from rhesus macaques, raising hopes of a similarly effective HIV vaccine.

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image: Toward a MERS Vaccine

Toward a MERS Vaccine

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers generate an infectious cDNA clone of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus genome that could inform vaccine design.

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Preliminary Malaria Vaccine Trial a Success

Preliminary Malaria Vaccine Trial a Success

By | August 9, 2013

An intravenous vaccine appears to protect adults from malaria infection in a Phase 1 clinical trial.

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