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image: Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

By | January 26, 2017

A sequencing blitz on the tomato genome reveals the genes that contribute most to tastiness.

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image: Toward Breaking the Cold Chain

Toward Breaking the Cold Chain

By | January 24, 2017

Research efforts aim to obviate the need for vaccine refrigeration.

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image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

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image: Toward a Virus-Free Polio Vaccine

Toward a Virus-Free Polio Vaccine

By | January 19, 2017

Researchers are developing polio vaccines based on the viral capsid alone. When produced in recombinant systems, these could eliminate the need to propagate live poliovirus for vaccine production. 

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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image: Ancient Origins of Retroviruses

Ancient Origins of Retroviruses

By | January 12, 2017

Foamy-like endogenous retroviruses may have emerged more than 450 million years ago, according to an analysis.

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image: Trumping Science: Part III

Trumping Science: Part III

By | January 12, 2017

Scientists criticize unconfirmed reports that President-elect Donald Trump has asked Robert Kennedy Jr., an anti-vaccine activist, to investigate vaccine safety.

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image: As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

By | January 10, 2017

Researchers describe how gene expression in different human brain regions is altered with age.

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image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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