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image: Virus Versus Bacteria

Virus Versus Bacteria

By | April 17, 2013

A newly developed drug, modeled after a bacteria-infecting virus, is less likely to become antibiotic resistant.

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image: Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

By | April 1, 2013

Professor, Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology. Age: 40


image: Week in Review: March 25-29

Week in Review: March 25-29

By | March 29, 2013

Microbes affect weight loss; dozens of cancer-linked genes identified; a climate change scientists speaks out about personal attacks; isolation among elderly linked to death


image: Microbes Affect Weight Loss

Microbes Affect Weight Loss

By | March 27, 2013

Microbial changes in the gut contribute to a patient’s ability to slim down after gastric bypass surgery.


image: Week in Review, March 18-22

Week in Review, March 18-22

By | March 22, 2013

Venom-based drugs for pain; microbes in the deep ocean; altruistic, suicidal bacteria; a call for open access; clinical sequencing; the newest genomes


image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.


image: Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

By | March 17, 2013

Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.


image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

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image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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