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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: Guppie Porn

Guppie Porn

By | August 1, 2016

Biologist Carin Bondar delivers a TED talk about the wilder side of sex.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | August 1, 2016

Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention

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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Semen Says

Semen Says

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

By | June 30, 2014

Species in a tightly knit genus of Old World primates have evolved tell-tale facial characteristics to prevent hybridization, a study shows.

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image: Females in Charge

Females in Charge

By | April 21, 2014

Insects in Brazil go beyond simple behavioral sex-role reversal. In these animals, the females use an erectile organ to penetrate the male’s genital chamber.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 17, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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