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image: Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

Image of the Day: Oculus Reparo

By | July 10, 2017

Following an injury to a Drosophila pupal wing, macrophages swoop in, engulfing debris and aiding in the tissue regeneration process.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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image: Lords of the Flies

Lords of the Flies

By | June 19, 2017

Biologists’ walk in the woods sparks the creation of a masterful fruit fly field guide. 

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

By | June 6, 2017

Numerous scientists are disappointed with the American Society for Microbiology’s decision, and some are hatching plans to keep the meetings alive.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

Opinion: The Virome and the Anti-vaccination Debate

By | June 6, 2017

Advances in microbiome research are increasingly used in anti-vaccination arguments, yet the science actually undermines the premise of the argument.

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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