The Scientist

» drosophila, microbiology and evolution

Most Recent

There is little evidence that full treatment durations discourage the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

2 Comments

image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

By | August 10, 2017

The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

0 Comments

image: Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

By | August 3, 2017

The paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.

0 Comments

image: Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

By | August 3, 2017

An arrest warrant has been issued for Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University in connection with a stabbing death in Chicago.

0 Comments

The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

1 Comment

A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

4 Comments

Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

0 Comments

image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

0 Comments

image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.
  2. German Scientists Resign from Elsevier Journals’ Editorial Boards
  3. Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia
  4. Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-Hub
RayBiotech