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Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery

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» drosophila, microbiology and evolution

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image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

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image: Week in Review: June 30–July 4

Week in Review: June 30–July 4

By | July 4, 2014

STAP retractions; comparing SCNT-derived stem cells with iPSCs; malaria-infected mice more attractive to mosquitoes; stem cell banks face business challenges

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image: Unraveling the Female Fruit Fly Mating Circuit

Unraveling the Female Fruit Fly Mating Circuit

By | July 2, 2014

Three teams identify different components of the female Drosophila nervous system that govern mating behaviors.

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image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

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image: Fatty Pheromones

Fatty Pheromones

By | July 1, 2014

A new class of pheromones, triacylglycerides, helps male fruit flies mark their mates to deter rivals.

2 Comments

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: Laser-Guided Cock Block

Laser-Guided Cock Block

By | July 1, 2014

See the experiment that used lasers and optogenetics to alter sexual behavior in Drosophila.

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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