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image: Brain Bugs

Brain Bugs

By | September 1, 2017

Neuropharmacologist John Cryan of University College of Cork in Ireland explains the links between the microbiome and the central nervous system.

1 Comment

image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

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image: Far-Out Science

Far-Out Science

By | September 1, 2017

How psychedelic drugs and infectious microbes alter brain function

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior

How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior

By | September 1, 2017

Researchers are piecing together the links between the gut microbiome and mental health.

3 Comments

image: Living Fabric

Living Fabric

By | September 1, 2017

See the bacteria-powered, breathable clothing made by former MIT researcher Wen Wang and colleagues.

2 Comments

image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

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Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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