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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.

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image: Picturing Inheritance, 1916

Picturing Inheritance, 1916

By | May 1, 2016

This year marks the centennial of Calvin Bridges’s description of nondisjunction as proof that chromosomes are vehicles for inheritance.

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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