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» drosophila, immunology and ecology

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

By | January 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley. Age: 39

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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Ibuprofen Extends Life?

Ibuprofen Extends Life?

By | December 22, 2014

The over-the-counter drug increases life span in yeast, nematode worms, and fruit flies, a study shows.

4 Comments

image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

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