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image: “Food Coma” Phenomenon Studied In Fruit Flies

“Food Coma” Phenomenon Studied In Fruit Flies

By | November 23, 2016

After a large meal, Drosophila seem to drift into a stuffed stupor.

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image: More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

By | November 22, 2016

The International Human Epigenome Consortium presents a series of studies on how epigenetics influences immunity, cell lineage determination, and differentiation.

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image: Out-of-Sync Light and Heat Levels Disrupt the Body’s Clock

Out-of-Sync Light and Heat Levels Disrupt the Body’s Clock

By | November 9, 2016

Six-hour time lags between daily cycles of light and heat lead the molecular pathways that help fruit flies keep track of time to go haywire.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nosing Around

Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

4 Comments

image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

3 Comments

image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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image: Time, Flies

Time, Flies

By | November 1, 2016

By studying the sleep-wake cycle of fruit flies, Amita Sehgal is revealing how the body’s circadian and sleep rhythms are regulated.

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image: Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

By | October 21, 2016

Type I interferon organizes several immune mechanisms to suppress B cell responses to a chronic viral infection.

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