The Scientist

» drosophila, culture and microbiology

Most Recent

image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

1 Comment

image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

0 Comments

An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

0 Comments

image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

0 Comments

image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

0 Comments

NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

1 Comment

image: An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

By | February 21, 2017

Stress-related genes may be preferentially and rhythmically expressed as part of the circadian rhythms of older fruit flies, researchers report.  

0 Comments

image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

0 Comments

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS