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image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: TS Live: Handy Apes

TS Live: Handy Apes

By | September 1, 2014

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

4 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

7 Comments

image: Expanding ENCODE

Expanding ENCODE

By | August 27, 2014

Latest Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data enable researchers to compare genome regulation across species. 

1 Comment

image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

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image: RNA-based Sex Determination?

RNA-based Sex Determination?

By | August 20, 2014

Researchers find that microRNAs may play a role some of the sexual differences seen in fruit flies.

1 Comment

image: Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

By | August 11, 2014

From cortical neurons, researchers have engineered rat tissue that formed complex networks of functioning neurons and appeared to behave normally after an injury.

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image: Molecular Neuroscientist Dies

Molecular Neuroscientist Dies

By | August 11, 2014

Stephen Heinemann, who along with his colleagues identified the genes encoding the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain, has passed away at age 75.

0 Comments

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