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Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

6 Comments

image: Expanding ENCODE

Expanding ENCODE

By | August 27, 2014

Latest Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data enable researchers to compare genome regulation across species. 

1 Comment

image: RNA-based Sex Determination?

RNA-based Sex Determination?

By | August 20, 2014

Researchers find that microRNAs may play a role some of the sexual differences seen in fruit flies.

1 Comment

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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