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image: Next Generation: See-through Mice

Next Generation: See-through Mice

By | July 31, 2014

An improved tissue-clearing technique makes whole animals transparent.

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Week in Review: July 14–18

Week in Review: July 14–18

By | July 18, 2014

Converting heart muscle to pacemaker cells in pigs; alternative splicing and the human proteome; questioning a reported yogurt mold-illness link; H. pylori swiftly find mouse stomach injuries

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image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

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image: Week in Review: June 30–July 4

Week in Review: June 30–July 4

By | July 4, 2014

STAP retractions; comparing SCNT-derived stem cells with iPSCs; malaria-infected mice more attractive to mosquitoes; stem cell banks face business challenges

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Unraveling the Female Fruit Fly Mating Circuit

Unraveling the Female Fruit Fly Mating Circuit

By | July 2, 2014

Three teams identify different components of the female Drosophila nervous system that govern mating behaviors.

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image: Fatty Pheromones

Fatty Pheromones

By | July 1, 2014

A new class of pheromones, triacylglycerides, helps male fruit flies mark their mates to deter rivals.

2 Comments

image: Laser-Guided Cock Block

Laser-Guided Cock Block

By | July 1, 2014

See the experiment that used lasers and optogenetics to alter sexual behavior in Drosophila.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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