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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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image: Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

By | March 14, 2017

Analysis of an ancient shark fossil provides the strongest evidence to date that modern sharks derive from a class of 400 million–year-old bony fish.

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“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

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image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

By | March 1, 2017

The principles of neuroplasticity may underlie the positive effects of music therapy in treating a diversity of diseases.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

By | February 21, 2017

Stress-related genes may be preferentially and rhythmically expressed as part of the circadian rhythms of older fruit flies, researchers report.  

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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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Speciation and development of new traits may not always go hand-in-hand.

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