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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

By | December 22, 2016

An anti-transposon pathway previously thought to function only in reproductive tissue also helps reduce harmful mutations in body cells of fruit flies.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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image: “Food Coma” Phenomenon Studied In Fruit Flies

“Food Coma” Phenomenon Studied In Fruit Flies

By | November 23, 2016

After a large meal, Drosophila seem to drift into a stuffed stupor.

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image: Out-of-Sync Light and Heat Levels Disrupt the Body’s Clock

Out-of-Sync Light and Heat Levels Disrupt the Body’s Clock

By | November 9, 2016

Six-hour time lags between daily cycles of light and heat lead the molecular pathways that help fruit flies keep track of time to go haywire.

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image: Time, Flies

Time, Flies

By | November 1, 2016

By studying the sleep-wake cycle of fruit flies, Amita Sehgal is revealing how the body’s circadian and sleep rhythms are regulated.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: Lateral Gene Transfer in <em>Drosophila</em>

Lateral Gene Transfer in Drosophila

By | October 1, 2016

DNA transfer is a regular event among bacteria, and research over the past decade has shown that microbes can also shuttle their genetic material to multicellular hosts.

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